Today I wanted to share with you some things I learned from a really awesome seminar I recently attend called: The Science of Timing. In this post I’m share 10 cool things I learned about Twitter. Keep an eye out for similar posts on timing for blog posts, e-mails and Facebook. Enjoy!

  1. Add a “+” symbol to other peoples’ shortened bit.ly links to see how many clicks they got.
  2. Using the words “official”, “founder”, “speaker” in your Twitter description gets you around 170-210 more followers than the average. Using words like “author”, “guru” gets you around 90 more followers than average.
  3. Retweets occur most often on your afternoon coffee break – between 2-5pm ET. On the other hand, the least favorable retweeting time is 8-10am.  Retweeting starts to drop off severely at 2am.
  4. Wednesday – Friday is a much more effective time get retweets than earlier in the week.
  5. People who tweet 22 times per day have the most followers.
  6. When it comes to clicks on Twitter, Monday is the worst day to get traffic from Twitter, Tuesday and Wednesday are the best. Clicks are pretty steady on the weekends as well, outpacing Monday’s and Thursdays.
  7. Clicks are at their lowest early morning, but peak just before lunchtime and between 4-6pm.
  8. If you’re looking for clicks on Twitter, tweet less often. One tweet per hour gets a 300% increase in CTR than five or more tweets per hour.
  9. Check out www.tweetwhen.com to find your optimal retweeting time.
  10. If you want to tweet the same link multiple times, change up the content / message significantly to avoid appearing spam-like, and to help get attention. Not to mention Twitter doesn;t allow you tweet exactly the same thing twice.

 

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Post Written By:

Brian Siddle

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